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On The Law Of Planetary Ordering [Review]

Updated: Apr 17

Author: Edward Otoo [Mfantsipim School]

[Image credit: Pixabay]


Abstract

This paper presents a discovery on how the planets in the solar system are in order based on the planetary fact sheet of NASA. On the basis of the data studied, a law is proposed to describe the ordering of planets in our solar system.


Introduction

The mystery behind the formation of the solar system intrigued the early scientists to a very great extent. Many theories were proposed to explain the formation or origin of the solar system. The theories that were proposed could not properly explain how our solar system was formed until in 1734, when a scientific breakthrough was achieved by Swedish scientist Emanual Swedenborg. He was the first to propose the nebula theory to explain the formation of the solar system.


About 4.6 billion years ago was when our solar system formed - 9.2 billion years after the Big Bang, a shockwave from a nearby supernova exploded, thus stimulating the formation of the solar system.


After the explosion, a giant nebula was formed and the force of gravity caused a small part of the giant nebula to collapse into a protoplanetary disk. Most of the disk material was focused on the center of this cloud and then it formed the sun. The outer part of the disk rotates, and this rotation causes groups of the disk material to clash and stick together, making the planets in the solar system.


Order of the planets from the sun

Our Solar System has eight 'official' planets which orbit the sun. Here are the planets listed in order of their distance from the sun:

MERCURY

VENUS

EARTH

MARS

JUPITER

SATURN

URANUS

NEPTUNE


Data

Four different datasets were used in this article from different sources to examine how the planets in the solar system are in order.


Planets in order of size:

Planets in order of mass:

Planets in order of revolution period:


Analysis and discussion

From the data studied, it shows clearly that only the planets in order of revolution periods correspond to the order of planets from the sun. The revolution period of a planet determines its average distance from the sun. The higher the revolution period of a planet, the more the average distance from the sun. The order of planets in the solar system is based on the revolution period of the planets. The size, mass, density, gravity, rotational period and other quantities about planets apart from the revolution period do not play a role in its ordering in the solar system. Our home planet, earth is the third planet in the solar system, based on its revolution period which is 365 days. Thanks to the revolution period, imagine where our planet Earth would be positioned in the solar system, if the order of the planets was based on either the planetary size, mass, rotational period, gravity or density.


The law of planetary ordering

The law of planetary ordering states that the planets in the solar system are in order of increasing distance from the sun based on the revolution period of each planet. The law of planetary ordering serves as the basis for Kepler’s third law of motion. The answer to why Kepler's third law occurs is the law of planetary ordering.


Conclusion

The law of planetary ordering describes how the planets in the solar system are in order. It also serves as the basis of Kepler’s third law of motion. Further studies into this work on how and why the planets are in order in the solar system the way we see, would help mankind to understand more and unravel the mysteries behind the universe. This work can help explain the origin or or how the solar system was formed.


Sources

Calvin J. Hamilton,“Composition Of The Solar System-Solar Views”. Solarviews.

https://solarviews.com/eng/solarsys.htm

“Order of the planets from the sun”. Universe Today.

https://www.universetoday.com/72305/order-of-the-planets-from-the-sun/


Figure sources

Dr. David R. Williams, “Planetary Fact Sheet-Metric”. NASA Goddard Space Flight Center.Last updated October 21, 2019. https://nssdc.gsfc.nasa.gov/planetary/factsheet/

Kate, Broome.2018.“Our solar system’s planets in order”. Science Trends. https://sciencetrends.com/great-planets-order-size-distance-sun/

"Kristen, Erickson.“How Do We Weigh Planets?”. Spaceplace, Last updated June 1, 2020

https://spaceplace.nasa.gov/planets-weight/en

“How long is a Year on Other Planets?”.Spaceplace, Last updated July 17, 2019 https://spaceplace.nasa.gov/planets/year-on-other-planets/en/


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